Earning Respect

Lesson 3: Topic 5 of 19

No longer should one expect their job title to automatically hand them the unearned respect of others; demographic changes mean that both seasoned workers and new hires must step up and demonstrate their skills and determination to serve. Whether leading or joining as a team member, leveraging your responsibilities to showcase your skills while serving others will reap dividends for  everyone. 

medical CEUs Ethics course DO MD RN LVN CNA LPC LNHA LNFA teamwork leadership integrity morals servant

What if you recognize entitlement in yourself? It isn’t the end of the line. People can be flexible in the right places when they choose to change

Hakon Grimstad on Unsplash medical CEUs Ethics course DO MD RN LVN CNA LPC LNHA LNFA teamwork leadership integrity morals servant

If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him.

Gandhi medical CEUs Ethics course DO MD RN LVN CNA LPC LNHA LNFA teamwork leadership integrity morals

Whether  your starting place was the difficult road or the smooth path, neither means that the rest of life will yield advantage to you. Life owes us nothing. You can still recognize the flawed thinking of entitlement and make wise decisions going forward.

We can all still choose character.

One man who did so was boxer Muhamad Ali. A controversial figure in the early days of his career, he is now considered a legend in the sport, earning him the nickname, “the Greatest.” In 1967, America was three years into the Vietnam war. Ali was in his mid-twenties, a time when most fighters are at their peak. Then he was drafted. Ali opposed the war on both religious and political grounds; faced with the choice of either serving in violation of his beliefs, or fleeing the country as did other draft dodgers, Ali chose a third option. He reported to his duty station and told them to arrest him. Ali was found guilty of evasion; he was stripped of his titles and his boxing license was revoked. Ali appealed his case all the way to the US Supreme Court, which in 1970 upheld his right to refuse to serve as a conscientious objector. 


Years later, after finally being allowed to resume his boxing career, Ali was dethroned as heavyweight champion in a loss to Leon Spinks in 1978. Ali accepted the loss with humility and class – as did Spinks in his victory. “I’m the best,” Spinks said, “but he’s still the Greatest.” Without question, both men had reputations of bragging and talking trash, but neither felt entitled to any special treatment or privilege, despite their accomplishments.